Sunday, May 06, 2012

The Absolute Best Way To Store Green Onions

My friend recently sent me a link on "the absolute best way to store green onions." Instead of putting bagged scallions in the crisper bin or vegetable drawer of a frigid and dark refrigerator, store them near a sunny window in a transparent glass of water (and change the water once it gets cloudy). To test this method of storage, I left some scallions in the fridge (on the right) and stuck the rest in a glass mason jar filled with tap water (on the left). The results were impressive.



It looks like an overgrown jungle in there! There was at least an inch of growth on the scallions that were partially submerged in water. Also, as you can visibly notice, the onions from the fridge were flaccid and droopy (and yellowed, but I cut those parts off). According to the link, the scallions will grow indefinitely (you are supposed to only use the verdant tops by snipping off what you need, and not the white portions), but I haven't tested this yet. And I have to admit, I'm a little suspicious about how the scallions would continue to grow without the nutrients from soil, but I'll let you know how this experiment goes!

Update: A fellow food blogger informed me (in the comments below) that after three (3) to four (4) weeks, the roots will begin to rot. But she gave her seal of approval to this method for short-term scallion storage! I should note that when I changed the water, I made sure to thoroughly rinse and scrub away the oniony slime on the bottom of the scallions. I also peeled back the visibly brown and wilted layers at the bottom that had been soaking in the water. It is a little gross, but I believe it helps the green onions keep their "shelf-life" longer. I also noticed the green parts of the scallions bent pretty easily (they do not seem very fibrous).

11 comments:

  1. I tried this for a few weeks. After some time, the roots began to rot despite changing the water. I think 3-4 weeks is about as long as you can really keep these growing. They're not meant to thrive without the nutrients from soil. But this method does extend the life of your scallions for a few more weeks which is more than enough.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the tip, Ngoc N! I did have some oniony smelling cloudy water when I first started, and now that you mention it, it totally makes sense to me that the roots would rot after being submerged in water (as they usually thrive in well-drained soil). I'd better use up those onions soon! :)

      Delete
  2. I will try this method for a while: thank you! That's a great & tasty result!
    I hope you are doing well, because I missed your presence & tasty recipes too! :)
    Big hugs from Belgium to you !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so wonderful, Sophie! I've missed you too! Hopefully I can get back into food blogging again and be consistent about it. Hugs and kisses back at you!

      Delete
  3. that's very cool, I've tried that with basil, not green onions. My technique is to cut both ends of the green onion, then roll it up in a paper towl inside of the plastic bag. It helps, but your onions look positively perky! I don't know though about this technique, cuz I do like using the white part of the stalks too...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, you definitely miss out using the white part of the green onion when using this method. Also, the green onions were pretty soft (not very fibrous). When you use that method with basil, do you put the roots inside water, or just the basil clippings?

      Delete
  4. I have been doing this for about three years and it's great. I buy organic green onions so I really feel like I'm getting my money's worth. I usually change the water daily. I first saw the tip on the Next Food Network Star and have been doing it ever since. My friends kidded me about it but then I found out they started doing it too - haha!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great idea! I saw organic green onions at Whole Foods today and bought a "reserve supply" for my water horticulture experiment!

      Delete
  5. If you only use the greens of the onion, why not put a pinch of plant food in the water?

    ReplyDelete
  6. I usually change the water daily. I first saw survival warehouse foods the tip on the Next Food Network Star and have been doing it ever since.

    ReplyDelete
  7. To test this method of storage, I left left 4 dead survival warehouse some scallions in the fridge (on the right)

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment! I read and enjoy every comment, and will try to reply if time permits. If you have a blog, please leave a link. I love to discover new and delicious sites!